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I have training and experience in shopping centre management, I’m putting ideas together on how to start my own property management company.Please give any ideas you may have,legal requirements as wel

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You as the entrepreneur need to refine your own business idea, once you have done this and have a clear picture in your mind of what the business will be, you can start stress testing this idea. Please see the article on testing your business idea for expert advice on how to do this.
For further insight and guidance on starting a new business please refer to the section of our website dedicated to start-ups.

Entrepreneur Magazine is South Africa's top read business publication with the highest readership per month according to AMPS. The title has won seven major publishing excellence awards since it's launch in 2006. Entrepreneur Magazine is the "how-to" handbook for growing companies. Find us on Google+ here.

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Self Development

Listening To These 8 Audiobooks On Success Is A Better Use Of Your Long Commute

Commuting is mostly just unpaid work, unless you make an effort to learn something along the way.

John Boitnott

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Commutes are getting longer, and in some cities they’re up to two hours each way. I have a friend in Los Angeles who does this. He passes the time with audiobooks. Now that’s still a lot of time to be stuck in transit, but he doesn’t view it that way. He says it allows him plenty of time to feed his personal and professional goals.

I’ve spent years listening to literature in the car while commuting, but somewhere along the line I switched over to books on business and personal improvement. I mostly gravitated toward amazing people who built their success from scratch and who experienced tremendous hardship. It stands to reason that if you’re dealing with hardships like a long commute, it’s important to hear motivational words that can help you transcend the difficulties.

Here are eight audiobooks that will help grow your success, both personal and professional, on your next commute:

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Entrepreneur Profiles

4 Lessons From The Pivotal Group Founders On Growing And Disrupting All At Once

Here’s how they’ve built what they believe to be the foundations of a successful group of businesses in five years.

Nadine Todd

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Vital stats

  • Company: Pivotal Group
  • Players: Paul Hutton, Joel Stransky and Bruce Arnold
  • What they do:  Pivotal pioneered voice biometrics in the financial and telecommunications market. Over time, the company has grown to include nine divisions across multiple sectors.
  • Launched: 2012
  • Visit: pivotalgroup.co.za

How do you build a disruptive business while also focusing on growth? Disruptive ideas are by definition new and unknown to the market. They defy traditional and established solutions and ways of doing business, and they require the market to be educated before you can really onboard clients or even sell your product or service.

The answer is to build parallel solutions: Business units that bring in revenue while the more disruptive ideas are being developed and introduced to the market. Here are the four top lessons the founders of the Pivotal Group have learnt while building their business and pursuing disruptive opportunities simultaneously.

1. Know who your competitors (and potential competitors) are

Great ideas that are economically viable and solve a need that consumers are willing to pay for are few and far between. Great ideas alone are a dime a dozen, but if you’ve spotted a need, chances are someone else has as well. You then need to step back and critically evaluate why someone else hasn’t done this before; if they have done it and they’ve failed; or if you’re entering shark-infested waters riddled with competitors.

Once you’ve determined there is a gap in the market, you need to evaluate who your potential competitors are, and the impact if they suddenly started offering a similar solution to the market.

For Paul Hutton, Bruce Arnold and Joel Stransky, the founders of OneVault, competition was always a factor, particularly as a start-up, and given that potential competitors included Bytes and Dimension Data, this was a very real factor to consider. After careful analysis, however, the founders decided to go for it. Their differentiator was their business model. They wouldn’t be selling OneVault as a software solution, but as a service.

Related: Which Of These 7 Personality Traits Do You Share With The World’s Richest People?

The idea had taken root while Paul was still CEO of TransUnion Credit Bureau. “I came across voice biometrics in Canada. There’s been a surge in identity fraud around the world, and I really understood the value of voice recognition as a verification tool,” he explains. “It can’t be faked, and it’s the only remote biometrics solution available, because you don’t physically need to be there to verify yourself.”

Paul had presented the idea to Transunion’s global board, and while they were intrigued, nothing came of it. “TransUnion’s model is to buy companies that are experts in their specific fields, not launch a new disruptive division from scratch.”

But this meant there was an opportunity for Paul to pursue the idea independently. Joel (former MD of Altech Netstar and CEO of Hertz SA) and Bruce (formerly Group CFO of TransUnion Africa and CFO at Unitrans Freight) were immediately interested in partnering with Paul. Both wanted to pursue entrepreneurship, although neither could do so immediately. The commitment was enough for Paul to get directly involved and start working on the business while he waited for his partners to join him.

In January 2011, Paul and Joel travelled to the UK and started investigating voice biometric solutions. “Voice biometrics was fairly new, but good technology was available, and there were global leaders in the sector,” says Joel.

It was important to choose the right product for the South African market, as this would form the basis of their offering. A contact at Dimension Data (one of whom became an investor in the business) offered this simple and straightforward advice:

When you’re choosing a technology partner, go with the company whose tech you’re confident in, and whose leadership is stable. You’re basing so much on this company and their longevity, so don’t disregard this criteria.

For Paul, Joel and Bruce, a US-based company, Nuance, ticked those boxes. But, from a competitive perspective, OneVault wasn’t the only potential player in the market. “Neither Bytes nor Dimension Data had gone into voice, but they had the potential to do so,” says Bruce. “The products were available to them through their partners.”

To mitigate this very clear risk, the founders made two critical decisions. “Our intention was to sell voice biometrics as a service, instead of a software solution that customers bought and owned, with the necessary infrastructure to go with it. The idea for OneVault was that there would be one place where your voice print lived, and different businesses could plug into our solution.”

The business model of large technology players in South Africa is to sell integrated software solutions, so OneVault’s business model was a differentiator. The next differentiator Paul, Bruce and Joel focused on was becoming specialists in their field.

“This is Paul’s baby,” says Bruce. “We’ve needed to build up a niche, expert team that specialises in voice biometrics. Because we aren’t generalists, 100% of our focus goes into this, instead of 5% or 10%.”

To attract the best in their fields, the founders needed a very appealing culture and a strong recruitment strategy. “We focused on what we wanted from our work environment, and then applied the same rules across the business,” says Joel. “Our goals were to drink good coffee, have no leave forms — ever; be able to take the time to ride our bikes and watch our kids play sports. If someone can’t make it work, or takes advantage without putting in the work, they come and go, but on the whole, we’ve had extremely low churn, and we’ve attracted — and kept — incredible talent.”

This differentiator would prove to be important for two reasons. First, two and a half years into the business, with investors on board and having pumped a significant amount of their own capital into the business, the team hit a major stumbling block. For a few weeks, they didn’t even know if they had a business.

“We had been operating on one major, and as it turned out, faulty, assumption,” says Paul. “We thought South African companies had the right telephony structure to implement our solution. We’d been building our solution on top of Nuance’s software, and were ready to start piloting the entire system with a few key customers, and we found out that in order to meet global voice biometric standards, the telephone technology had to be G711 compliant. South Africa was operating on G729.”

This was OneVault’s make or break moment. The team had six weeks to come up with a solution that ensured it met the necessary levels of accuracy. Without a highly skilled team this would have been impossible.

Even as a start-up, the strategy had been to only bring the best of the best on board. “We didn’t interview,” says Bruce. “We approached people whom we knew. We approached the best in the industry, and convinced them to take a chance with us. There was risk, but there were also rewards.” One of those people was Bradley Scott, a brilliant engineer whom both Paul and Bruce had worked with at Transunion.

Today, OneVault is one of the most specialist companies in the world, and often asked to speak at events in the US.

Being the niche specialists paid off, and OneVault achieved the almost impossible. But this had its downside.

Once you’ve shown something can be done, the bar of what’s impossible moves. Competitors enter your space.

This was the second reason why being such focused, niche experts paid off. “We demo’d the solution for a large local corporate, they loved it, and then went to a ‘then’ competitor  to implement it,” says Paul.

“We always knew this was a real danger. Players like Bytes and Dimension Data have solid, existing client relationships with the same companies we’re targeting.”

18 months later the project still wasn’t working. “This is deep specialist knowledge,” says Paul. “Knowledge we built while we created our offering.” OneVault won the contract, and developed a partnership with Bytes at the same time. Today, OneVault works with all the major software integrators in the market. “We’re a specialist service they can offer their clients, without needing to put the same time and energy we needed to put in to become the specialists.”

Through a focused strategy, OneVault has become a partner, rather than a competitor, of some of the largest players in the industry.

2. Understand the nature of disruption so that you can prepare for it

pivotal-group

In today’s ever-changing and fast-paced business world, most business experts are in agreement that as a company, you’re either the disruptor, or you’re being disrupted. The problem is that disruption comes with its own set of challenges.

“Our entire business model was built around a subscription service. Instead of a company buying a software solution, installing it and running it internally, we would do all of that. We would carry the infrastructure burden, and the high upfront cost,” says Joel.

In theory, this sounded like a clear win for businesses that would benefit from a voice biometrics solution. The reality is never so simple, particularly when you’re a disruptor.

“The software is expensive, and so we thought this would be seen as an excellent solution,” says Paul. “Instead, we faced a lot of reticence over the cloud. Businesses didn’t trust it yet.”

On top of that, first movers are often faced with a lag in corporate governance guidelines. As technology becomes more sophisticated, so governance guidelines change — but it’s a slow process, and the lag can impede disruptors.

“You also can’t give proper reference cases, because it’s all brand new to your market,” says Paul. “The best we had was a case study of how well it had worked in Turkey.”

To compound matters, proof of revenue is essential for businesses wanting to trade with large corporates, but non-existent in the start-up phase.

So, what’s the solution? According to Joel, Bruce and Paul, it’s all about being patient, never giving up, building gravitas and getting a few clients on board, even if it’s free of charge to build up your reputation and prove your concept. Finally, you need to bring in revenue from more traditional channels to support your disruptive products and solutions.

“Disruptive solutions are by their nature new and different, which means change management for your customers. This makes the sales cycle long and complex, and you have to be prepared for that,” says Bruce.

Don’t stop laying your groundwork. While disruptors are ahead of the curve, you need to be ready for the uptake when it arrives. “We’ve now concluded a partnership with South Africa Fraud Prevention Services,” says Paul. “When an imposter calls we won’t only  terminate the transaction but we will alert the identity being compromised in the attempt and we will actively prevent fraud by contacting Fraud Prevention. The ultimate vision is for every South African’s voice biometric signature to live in our vault, and we are already receiving imposter information.”

3. Cultivate additional revenue streams

So, what do you do while you are living through the extremely long sales turnaround time of your disruptive, game-changing solution? Bills still have to be paid and investment is needed to develop truly disruptive ideas.

First, the team realised that while an annuity subscription service was their ultimate goal and where the industry was heading, initially they needed to be able to sell and implement the software.

It’s worth noting that one of OneVault’s earliest customers who bought the software has since launched a new business, which is on OneVault’s annuity service model. The shift has just taken time. “The change is happening, but it’s been slower than we anticipated,” says Bruce. “We needed to accept that fact and sell the software to bring revenue into the business while we were waiting for the market to catch up.”

It’s an important lesson. You don’t want to get distracted from your vision, but you need to be bringing in revenue, even if that means your short-term strategy differs from your long-term goals.

“It took three years before we really started seeing a move towards hosted solutions,” he adds. “Outsourced and offsite solutions are opex environments, not capex. They are more cost-effective for customers, but they require a shift in thinking. It’s a move away from how things have always been done, and that takes time.”

But, while Paul, Bruce and Joel were learning the art of patience, they also needed to start bringing revenue into the business.

Related: 8 Inspirational Quotes From Movie Mogul Steven Spielberg

“It was clear that we needed to find other opportunities,” says Joel. The result is the Pivotal Group, a diversified holding company with different businesses that are interlinked and complementary.

The group’s first business outside of OneVault, Pivotal Data, was based on a large call centre contract Joel, Paul and Bruce secured. “You can’t be an expert in everything – when you specialise you will always be more successful. The trick is to partner with other experts,” says Joel. In this case, three entrepreneurs were opening a call centre — this was their area of expertise; they were absolute subject matter experts. What they weren’t experts in was technology or facilities management. Instead of doing it themselves, they were looking for partners.

“We manage everything aside from the people element,” explains Joel. “We found and leased a building, built the bespoke workspace, put in the technology, and managed the facility and IT on an opex basis back to them.”

The business immediately had a good anchor client, and Pivotal Data has built on that. The annuity income has supported further growth.

“This was a base for us, but we’ve acquired a few businesses on the back of this success, and created our own cloud contact centre solution — which also feeds into what we’re doing with OneVault,” says Bruce. “Our vision is to create a technology stack that’s world-class and provides a range of services that no other businesses provide as a single solution.”

Because of this pivot into call centre management, a new opportunity has presented itself, and Pivotal’s ambition has grown to include a solution that calls, authenticates, and then analyses all the data that is collected during those calls.

“Through partnerships, my team has developed a predictive analytics system that gives contact centres deep diagnostic tools. We can predict why agents are having the conversations they have, and what to tweak to improve them. We see the agent’s problem before they do. This isn’t just value add, it’s a revenue generating tool if it improves lead conversion rates and customer service. It’s also all geared to lowering call volumes.

“We know we need to keep looking forward. OneVault is starting to gain real traction, but we need to be working on the next disruptive solution and model. We can’t sit back and relax,” says Bruce.

“Three years ago we said that’s it; no more start-ups or investing in pre-adoption phase businesses. From now on, everything we do will be revenue generating,” says Paul. “We’d stretched three years of runway to five years in OneVault, and we didn’t want to keep doing that. We wanted instant revenue businesses. And the very next thing we did was invest in a start-up. It’s a crazy space, but it’s also very rewarding.”

To sustain it, the group continues to grow, focusing on investing in businesses and entrepreneurs who are subject matter experts and therefore already know and understand the market, and then positioning each new business or service to plug into the current offering.

“Data is our golden thread — technology and the disruptive space,” says Joel.

4. Be open to new ideas and opportunities

pivotal-group-south-africa-founders

Integral to the Pivotal Group’s positioning is Paul, Bruce and Joel’s focus on supporting other business owners whose offerings align with the group’s own growth goals, and who would benefit from joining a group.

“If your goal is to be disruptive, you need to be open to all kinds of new ideas,” says Joel. Some will be better than others, and the co-founders have made the decision to focus on the ‘jockey’ rather than the business as a result. Business offerings and ideas need to pivot. If you have the right partners, finding a solution is all part of the challenge.

Pivotal’s move into the world of artificial intelligence is due to one such partnership. “One of our clients approached us with a concept. But he needed a partner to develop it into a proper AI solution,” says Joel.

It’s an augmented intelligence solution that focuses on recruitment, talent management and career guidance. The solution screens, ranks and matches candidates against a job profile, or a number of profiles. It’s a multidisciplinary platform that predicts the performance of the individual in a role.

“Our partner is a former Accenture consultant and a leader in this field. His focus is on the IP and science of the product, ours is on the business component.”

The challenge is how to commercialise and scale the business in as short a time frame as possible. Like many disruptive products, the adoption process is a stumbling block. “We invest at the pre-adoptive curve — not at the revenue generating stage, which means a big focus is always on how we can take an idea and build it into a revenue generating business,” says Bruce.

The business uses capital selectively. “We want to invest in and drive our own agenda,” says Paul. “We’re in charge of our own destiny, but it’s not comfortable or simple. We came from corporate. Big machines that you need to direct and keep on course. This is an entirely different challenge and we are still learning.”

Related: Listen And Learn: Why Podcasts Aren’t Just For Start-up Founders


Listen to the podcast

Matt BrownMatt Brown interviews Paul, Joel and Bruce and discusses what it’s like to invest in pre-adoptive start-ups and staying ahead of the curve.

To listen to the podcast, go to mattbrownmedia.co.za/matt-brown-show or find the Matt Brown Show on iTunes or Stitcher.

The Matt Brown Show is a podcast with a listenership in over 100 countries and is designed to empower entrepreneurs around the world through information sharing.

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Lessons Learnt

Sennergi’s David Hounson 4 Tools To Help Weather The (Entrepreneurial) Storms You Will Face

David Hounson understands the school of hard knocks. He’s an alumni, having learnt the hard way the emotional toll entrepreneurship can take on you. Here’s how he’s weathered the storm.

Nadine Todd

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Vital Stats

  • Player: David Hounson
  • Company: Sennergi
  • What they do: Entrepreneurial inspirational speaking; entrepreneurial events and product manufacturing
  • Visit: www.sennergi.co.za

David Hounson believes that there are two types of entrepreneurs in this world, those who roll up their sleeves, and those who don’t. “There’s a different energy between the two, and for me, hands down the winner are the business owners who roll up their sleeves,” he says.

That’s the entrepreneur who is emotionally invested in the journey, which can be a strong success factor. Unfortunately, it also leaves you exposed when things get tough, as David discovered the hard way.

“Entrepreneurship can be an incredibly fulfilling and at the same time painful journey,” he says. “You need to build the mental tools necessary to not only survive, but thrive in this environment.”

David and his wife, Taryn Human, have spent the last three years developing a low GI drink that they will be taking to market in 2018. It’s been a long journey, filled with hardships and heartbreak, and yet through it all, David didn’t give up. Instead, he built the mental tools he needed to keep pushing forward. He’s now sharing those lessons with fellow entrepreneurs, paying it forward in the hope that he will in some small way drive entrepreneurship in South Africa.

Building the tools that will achieve personal success

TOOL 1: Build your confidence

David’s background is in sales and marketing. He was a school drop-up, but built up a career, first in the UK, and later in South Africa, based on his talent for connecting with others. In short, David had a big mouth and could talk his way into — and out of — anything. At first, he just had the gift of the gab, but as the years progressed he learnt the value of authenticity, transparency, and adding value to your clients.

Related: Want To Feel Empowered? Check Out These 17 Quotes From Successful Entrepreneurs And Leaders

By 2012 he had built up a solid reputation, and was approached by a manufacturer who wanted to produce a low GI drink, but needed a sales and marketing partner. The offer sounded good and would include shares. Instead, it was David and Taryn’s first introduction to what it means when you give your power to someone else.

“There were a lot of internal politics that we ignored. We should have listened to our gut, but instead, we saw their money and supposed expertise and took everything they said at face value. Never go into a partnership where you aren’t on an equal footing, even if that footing is completely in the mind. We were insecure, and this created a situation where we could be taken advantage of.

“You need to have confidence in who you are, and what you bring to the table. Know your worth. The greater your confidence, the harder it will be for others to take advantage of you. The great thing about confidence though, is that it’s like a muscle. If you work on it, you will grow it.”

It took David and Taryn time to walk away from their first partners, but they made the tough decision to cut their losses. The partnership would never be equal, promises were not being kept, and they realised they needed to take back their power.

It was an expensive move. They’d put a lot into the business and were now going it alone with a two-year-old toddler at home, bills to be paid and a lot of debt.

It’s not always easy, but sometimes the first step towards success is taking ownership of your destiny and holding yourself accountable. Take back your power, choose to be the architect of your own success, and then gradually build up your confidence.

DO THIS: Focus on your power and where you draw it from. This doesn’t need to be based on money or even academic partnerships, but what you uniquely bring to the table. And then build on this. Confidence is a muscle — you need to work it. Don’t become arrogant; build a quiet surety that believes in your own self-worth.

TOOL 2:  Focus on the long-term rewards

david-hounson

For David, despite over a decade of building a career, reputation and a measure of success, the move took him back to his childhood years when every cent counted.

“As a kid, I was brought up with no money. Everything was scarce. Now I was experiencing this again in my 30s. We’d eat a can of baked beans for dinner. My wife made us stretch everything, which is how we made it — and also how we stuck to the dream and didn’t throw in the towel. We made ends meet, even if it was just barely.”

It was a deeply personal and painful journey for David though, bringing to the surface memories of suffering he’d experienced in his youth and thought he’d left behind.

“When you have a goal, it’s amazing what you’ll do to achieve it, but you have to stay focused, and keep the destination in mind. Taryn was integral to the journey we’ve travelled to reach this point. We’ve invested in developing the drink, and we wouldn’t have been able to do any of it, particularly in the early days, without being uncompromising and rigorous in how we spent our money.

“We were broke, we needed to formulate the product with a credible food technologist — who we paid upfront — we weren’t interested in another partnership, and we needed to pay our personal bills. It was a delicate balance. We could have thrown in the towel, found jobs and given up on the dream. Instead, we chose short-term suffering for long-term reward.”

At the time, David realised that the business needed an additional revenue stream, so he went back to his marketing roots, offering marketing and printing services to local businesses. “We’ve built up some great retainers and we outsource printing, flyers, embroidery and anything else our clients need for their marketing campaigns.” This has grown into a more holistic marketing solution, including entrepreneurial events and helping businesses determine how they access markets and work as teams.

DO THIS: Start at the destination and reverse engineer how you’re going to get there. Focus on every aspect of the journey, and what will take you to the next pivotal moment in your business’s success. This often requires short-term pain for long-term gain. Be clear on what you’re willing to sacrifice to achieve your goals, and then stick to the plan with grit and determination.

TOOL 3:  Patience is a form of action

As a salesman and marketer, much of David’s professional career has been built around targets. Sales is not by nature a patient profession. Entrepreneurship is very different. It’s a long game, and as David discovered first–hand, sometimes you have to give things the time and space they need to happen.

“I learnt that patience is a form of action too. For three years I had to have the patience to let things come to fruition. I had to become mindful of where I am, where I am coming from, and where I am going.”

David used this time for self-reflection and personal growth. “I needed to find self-belief. No one is going to do this for you. You need to build your own resilience, courage and patience.

“We’re all so busy chasing targets, deadlines, goals and sales that we don’t stop and take the time to connect with our inner selves. I discovered that the time I took to really question who I am, why I’m here and what my greater purpose is not only helped me become more focused and centred, but better equipped to handle the rigours and challenges of entrepreneurship.

“We spend so much time focusing on how to build better businesses, that we don’t give ourselves enough attention.

“The reality is that when you do things from an internal space, you’re not just more centred, but you’re aligning the heart with the brain. It’s incredibly powerful. If you can love all of your imperfections, understand yourself and how you react to the world and shape things around you — and why — you’ll not only find alignment in everything you do, and every personal and business relationship you nurture, but you’ll find an incredible untapped resource of power as well.”

DO THIS: External factors are important, but don’t let them drive you without also focusing on the internal factors. Start working on your EQ, or ‘heart energy’ as David calls it. “That’s the power of the heart. 40 000 neuro cells per second travel from the heart to the brain.

“The heart has its own power and intelligence, we just need to learn to listen to what it’s telling us. Take notice of the energy in a room — good or bad — and learn to trust it. Intentionally allow the heart to send signals to the brain for alignment. Intuition, gut feel — this is the heart talking. We need to expand our ideas of the tools available to us, and what we can do with them.”

Related: 10 Things Successful People Tell Themselves Every Day

TOOL 4: Share your journey

When David was near his lowest, practicing patience and trying to envision the success of the low GI drink that he and Taryn had worked so hard to achieve, one of his marketing clients, a car dealership in Krugersdorp, asked him to give a talk to their sales team.

“The marketing manager loved my story, energy and passion. She understood that there were still mountains I was climbing, but she also loved the fact that I had already begun to approach what we were doing from a positive place, and not a place of fear.

“She understood what sales people go through, and asked me to share my story. It was the first time I gave a talk on the lessons I’d been learning, internalising and using in my life. I was open about the fact that I was still on the journey, and didn’t have all the answers, but this was where I was, and what I could share.

“The response was incredible, but I also realised how much value I got out of sharing my story. Entrepreneurship can be lonely. When we share, we not only learn from each other, but add value to each other, and feed our own sense of purpose.

“I started speaking to corporates, sales people and entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs in particular need assistance, and so I developed corporate-sponsored entrepreneurial events that give brands access to entrepreneurs, and entrepreneurs access to each other. We have two speakers on the evening — myself and a guest profile who has real business successes and lessons to share. They focus on business development and pushing through the hardships, and I focus on the soft skills and emotional intelligence — the inner turmoil entrepreneurs need to work through to find success.

“These events take place in Soweto, the CBD and suburbs, and the goal is to bring entrepreneurs together, share stories, support one another and learn. This isn’t a business driven by profits, but is a purpose-driven passion project. If we can help others find significance, I believe that will help us find our own significance.”

Today David is a coach, mentor and speaker, largely because he’s willing to share his story, and wants to help others find their inner-strength and success.

DO THIS: Find a way to share your journey. Join an association or entrepreneurial forum, or if you’re an employed professional, an industry group where you can share your journey and learn from your peers. The goal is personal growth, and the act of sharing your story and learning lessons from others can help you push the needle. You just need to be open to the idea and willing to network.


Get started

To get started on your journey of personal development, consider these five tools:

  1. Keep a notebook and jot down your emotions throughout the day. Recognise the emotion that keeps popping up — is it fear, risk-taking, money-related? If the same thing keeps coming up, you need to recognise it and face it.
  2. Start meditating. Meditation uses quiet time and breathing exercises to help you become mindful. This is the foundation of more focused mindfulness.
  3. Exercise daily. Besides the fact that it’s good for you to exercise daily from a health perspective (and healthy entrepreneurs have more energy and focus), this also teaches you discipline, one of the most basic fundamentals of success. Put a system in place and follow it — learn to stick to things and follow routines, and you’ll be amazed by how this will naturally impact your life and business in positive ways.
  4. Restrict TV. Watch YouTube instead. It’s an incredible lesson channel. Search by topics and subscribe to TED Talks instead of falling into the trap of randomly watching TV with no clear benefits.
  5. Look at your emotions as you would any other muscle. Work it out. Build it up. Focus on it and recognise it as a tool that can help or hinder you. Remember, when you build up an emotional muscle of strength, if someone asks you to do something, the answer always becomes yes, even if you don’t know how it will be achieved. Will you get it done? Yes! How? I don’t know, but I will.

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